Soundcheck on film

Last weekend I was covering a rock concert. I was shooting video but I found some time during soundcheck to shoot a roll of film with the Nikon F801s and the 50mm f/1.4 lens.

I had to push Ilford HP5 at ISO 1600 in order to get a decent shutter speed at f/1.4 and f/2. The film was developed with Ilford Ilfotec DD-X, an excellent developer for pushing films. Development time was 14 minutes at 20C. Pushing HP5 by two stops increases contrast a lot , and this is really a look I had always liked!

 (c)2018 Konstantinos Besios. All rights reserved.

You can buy fine art prints from my best images at my eshop.

 

 

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Velvia II 4K slideshow

This is the second part of my Velvia slideshow video. Images taken  with the wonderful Fuji Velvia 50 slide film. All images were taken with the Plaubel Makina 67 and Mamiya 645 Pro TL cameras.

 c)2018 Konstantinos Besios. All rights reserved.

You can buy fine art prints from my best images at my eshop.

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Limited Edition Infrared Prints

A new series of limited edition prints of infrared photos are available for sale on my eshop.

Only 20 prints of each image are available, hand signed and at 30x20cm size (11.8 x 7.8 inches).

All prints include a 1″ white border around the image to allow for future framing and matting, if desired. Free shipping worldwide.

 

(c)2018 Konstantinos Besios. All rights reserved.

 

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New prints for sale

I have added new fine art prints for sale in my eshop, including three infrared signed limited editions of 20 prints. You can visit my eshop by clicking here.

 

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Waterfalls

A collection of waterfall images from my archive.

(click on each image to see larger size).

(Sony A7s, Sony 24-70mm f/4 lens)

 

(Sony A7s, Sony 24-70mm f/4 lens)

 

(Nikon D700, Nikon 24mm f/2.8 lens)

 

(Nikon D700, Nikon 135mm f/2 lens)

 

(Leica M8, Leica Elmarit 28mm f/2.8 lens, B+W 092 infrared filter)

 

(Leica M8, Leica Voigtlander Skopar 21mm f/4  lens, B+W 092 infrared filter)

 

(Leica M8, Leica Elmarit 28mm f/2.8 lens, B+W 092 infrared filter)

 

(Leica M1, Leica Elmar 50mm f/2.8 lens, Fuji Velvia 50 film)

 

(Mamiya 645, Mamiya Sekkor-C 80mm f/2.8 lens, Kodak TMAX 100 film)

 

(Plaubel Makina 67, Ilford XP2 400 film)

 

 

(Mamiya 645, Sekkor-C 45mm f/2.8 lens, Ilford Delta 100 film)

(Mamiya 645, Sekkor-C 45mm f/2.8 lens, Ilford Delta 100 film)

(c)2018 Konstantinos Besios. All rights reserved.

You can buy fine art prints from my best images at my eshop.

 

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Infrared Athens

Infrared photos taken in Athens, GREECE  with a Leica M8 camera and B+W 092 IR filter. A unique camera, the M8 has been with me for many years now and is still alive and kicking! One of the best cameras for street photography, and of course you get the added benefit of an infrared camera that can be shot handheld at decent shutter speeds.

(click on each image to view large size).

 (c)2018 Konstantinos Besios. All rights reserved.

You can buy fine art prints from my best images at my eshop.

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Exploring Sprocket Rocket camera

A special film camera for today’s pos, the Sprocket Rocket. . It’s made from Lomography (I also used to own the Holga 120WPC medium format panoramic pinhole camera, Lomo Products are great toy cameras with a distinct look on their images).
The Sprocket takes 35mm film, so you get a lot of panoramic shots per film. It’s distinctive characteristic is of course the one you will notice on the image below (no words needed !!)

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As with most of Lomograghy cameras, it’s operation is pretty basic. You get to choose between f11 and f16 (I almost always shoot it on the f11), and there are two shutter speed options, 1/100 and Bulb. With Bulb you need to keep the shutter lever down for the whole exposure time (I would prefer a cable release option like the Holga 120WPC, since holding the lever for a long time is not ideal). You can always attach a string with a pebble for example on the shutter lever to keep it down but that’s too much innovation for me 🙂
You also get to choose between 0.6-1m focus and infinity. You advance the film using two knobs (wind and rewind), so double exposure is easy, also you can fully rewind the film and shoot all over again to create double or multiple exposures on the same frame.
The frame indicator is easy to read and allows you to advance the film with good precision so that you don’t overlap frames.

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The viewfinder is not very accurate so it takes a couple of rolls to guess the exact frame (I wear glasses so maybe that’s my fault). The fixed shutter speed of 1/100 makes it tricky to get the correct exposure, basically you just shoot (or put the camera on a tripod if you want to use longer speeds). That fixed speed also defines pretty much the speed of film you will use. From my personal experience I have concluded that ISO 400 and ISO 200 films work best for daylight shots. My main choices are Fujicolor 200 (a cheap film which get the job done since the image quality of the Sprocket Rocket is of course not on par with a “normal” camera). Also the Fuji Superia XTRA-400 provides both the speed and color saturation for a good image.

There is also a removable mask inside the camera so that you choose whether you want the sprockets on your photos or just normal panoramic frames.
Basically, that’s all about the Sprocket Rocket camera. I always enjoy using Lomography cameras, they are fun to use and many times the results are worth it !!
Enough with words, here are the images (all shot with the Sprocket Rocket loaded with Fujicolor 200 film).

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(c)2018 Konstantinos Besios. All rights reserved.

You can buy fine art prints from my best images at my eshop.

 

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Landscape with Gaoersi 617 panoramic camera

(click on image to see large size).

Landscape photo taken at Plastiras Lake with a Gaoersi 6×17 panoramic camera and Nikkor 90mm f/4.5 SW lens. My film of choice was an old Kodak Portra 160VC (now discontinued). 

©2018 Konstantinos Besios. All Rights Reserved.

You can buy fine art prints from my best images at my eshop.

 

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Shooting with a 8×10 large format pinhole camera

A pinhole camera is actually a box with a small hole which allows light to enter on film. There is no lens or any mechanisms, just a light-proof box with a hole. I have shot pinhole cameras like the Holga 120 WPC, and what you get is a very specific kind of image, no sharpness like a camera with a lens, but with a very interesting look.

What you see above is a 8×10 large format pinhole camera. A box which takes 8×10 sheet film, and a small hole on the front which translates to an f/400 aperture and a focal length about 15mm.

A f/400 aperture means that on a bright sunny day with an ISO 100 film you need about 5 seconds exposure. Add to that reciprocity failure, and you get the point, very long exposures!!

8×10 film is very expensive, I had purchased a few years ago two packs of film, Ilford FP4 and Provia 100F (and still have many sheets left, since I only shoot only a  few sheets  every year). The choice of FP4 was not really wise, a 400 ISO film would be more appropriate for a pinhole camera. Provia has excellent reciprocity behaviour so I don’t worry about that.

(Pinhole 8×10 camera, Ilford FP4 film, 210 seconds exposure)

I base my calculations on the Ilford chart formula: Ec=Em^1.48 (Ec is the corrected exposure, and Em is the measured exposure, in seconds). So far, it has proven quite accurate.

(Pinhole 8×10 camera, Ilford FP4 film, 9 seconds exposure)

This camera has no viewfinder, but I use an old Voigtlander 15mm viewfinder to determine my frame (not with the highest accuracy but at least you get a good feeling of what you are about to shoot. It helps a lot.

Since exposures are so long, a good and sturdy tripod is necessary to minimize camera movement. The image lacks the sharpness of a normal camera with a lens, so you don’t want to further decrease the image quality.

(Pinhole 8×10 camera, Ilford FP4 film, 15 seconds exposure)

(Pinhole 8×10 camera, Ilford FP4 film, unknown exposure)

(Pinhole 8×10 camera, Ilford FP4 film, 240 seconds exposure)

(Pinhole 8×10 camera, Ilford FP4 film, unknown exposure)

(Pinhole 8×10 camera, Ilford FP4 film, unknown exposure)

The above image is my favourite from this camera. Unfortunately I didn’t write down the exposure time. I have made a contact print from this sheet, and it looked great.  

I develop the black and white sheets using the taco method in a Paterson tank. It works fine. 

I have only shot two sheets of Provia 100F slide film with this camera. The results were not good, but I believe it was my mistake, somewhere in the process of placing the exposed film on a box I allowed light to harm the sheet. You can see the effect on the two images below.

I am probably going to try and shoot again slide film with this camera in the near future. I hope with more consistent results this time. 

Overall, the whole experience of using a 8×10 pinhole camera is very enjoyable for me, you never really know how the images will turn out! It also easy to contact print the sheet and get a 8×10 size print. Full analog experience!!!

You can always start with a smaller sheet format , a 4×5 pinhole camera like the Harman Titan 4×5 for example. 

More images coming from this camera soon…

 

©2018 Konstantinos Besios. All Rights Reserved.

You can buy fine art prints from my best images at my eshop.

 

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Sea Umbrellas

This is one of my favorite captures, sea umbrellas on a cold winter’s day. Image was taken with a Fuji GSW690iii camera and Ilford Pan F Plus film.

(click on image to see large size)

©2018 Konstantinos Besios. All Rights Reserved.

You can buy fine art prints from my best images at my eshop.

 

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