Fields images with Mamiya 645 and Kodak Portra 160VC

Lately I have been lots of fields images. The patterns created really have caught my interest and I really like the simplicity of these photos. Mostly green and brown tones under a blue sky and a a great view which stretches until the horizon.

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I have used the Fuji X100,Sony NEX 5 and Leica M8 cameras on fields with good results, but the Mamiya 645 with Kodak 160VC really surpasses them all. Beautiful vivid colors, great tones and a huge dynamic range to deal with the contrasty scenery. The 160VC managed to capture all tones and provided me with images that needed almost no corrections at all. On the other side, my digital cameras struggled with highlights and needed lots of process to create a good looking image. The look of images taken with the Portra 160VC never cease to amaze me. Since this film has been recently discontinued, I have ordered lots of rolls to keep me going for a while until I switch to the new Portra 16 Professional (which I haven’t tested yet).

Operating the Mamiya 645 Pro TL is really an easy task comparing to my rangefinder and panoramic camera. It has a very accurate meter, a motor drive to automatically advance film, and since it’s a SLR camera you can view instantly through the viewfinder the depth of field and the filters effects (mostly the polarizer). The second back provides me with the “luxury” of changing films mid-roll and my three lenses (45mm, 80mm, 150mm which translate to 28,50,90 focal length) are exactly what I need for my style of photography.

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The only downside on this camera is the 6×4.5 size of the negative which is kinda small. The images have great sharpness, color and tones but I have been used to 6×7 and 6×9 so much, that you can clearly see the difference on large prints. Still, you get 15 frames per roll and quick operation which in different situations are preferable.

Enough with words here are the rest of the images.

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(c)2011 Konstantinos Besios. All rights reserved.

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